Minimum data set as a necessity for designing a mobile-based self-care application for skin and hair diseases.

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    • Abstract:
      Background A minimum data set (MDS) helps patients to improve their self-management practices and allows doctors to better analyse their patients' health status. This study is designed to identify a MDS for a mobile-based self-care application (app) using herbal treatments for 19 common skin and hair diseases. Methods In this descriptive and analytical study, a comprehensive study of a MDS for a self-care program for the herbal treatment of 19 common skin and hair diseases is outlined. The research tool was a questionnaire developed by the researchers. The developed questionnaire had three main axes - app functionality (eight questions), elements of the temperament survey (ten questions), and a clinical section (273 questions). The content validity of the questionnaire was assessed using a content validity ratio (CVR) and the reliability of the questionnaire was assessed using a 5-point Likert scale. The data were analysed using SPSS 0.19. Results Out of 291 data elements that were placed on the initial survey, 19 components having a CVR below 62% were eliminated. In the results of the subsequent 5-point Likert scale, the average scores of respondents - except one that was 65% and was deleted - were above 75% and acceptable. The Cronbach's alpha (α) was found to be excellent (α=94.8%). This resulted in a total of 271 items in the final questionnaire. Conclusion Determining a MDS for self-care from the viewpoint of relevant specialists will be effective in caring for patients. As such, the present study provides information on the most common skin and hair diseases. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
    • Abstract:
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