Factors Related to Sustained Use of a Free Mobile App for Dietary Self-Monitoring With Photography and Peer Feedback: Retrospective Cohort Study

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  • Additional Information
    • Publication Information:
      JMIR Publications, 2014.
    • Publication Date:
      2014
    • Abstract:
      BackgroundHealthy eating interventions that use behavior change techniques such as self-monitoring and feedback have been associated with stronger effects. Mobile apps can make dietary self-monitoring easy with photography and potentially reach huge populations. ObjectiveThe aim of the study was to assess the factors related to sustained use of a free mobile app (“The Eatery”) that promotes healthy eating through photographic dietary self-monitoring and peer feedback. MethodsA retrospective analysis was conducted on the sample of 189,770 people who had downloaded the app and used it at least once between October 2011 and April 2012. Adherence was defined based on frequency and duration of self-monitoring. People who had taken more than one picture were classified as “Users” and people with one or no pictures as “Dropouts”. Users who had taken at least 10 pictures and used the app for at least one week were classified as “Actives”, Users with 2-9 pictures as “Semi-actives”, and Dropouts with one picture as “Non-actives”. The associations between adherence, registration time, dietary preferences, and peer feedback were examined. Changes in healthiness ratings over time were analyzed among Actives. ResultsOverall adherence was low—only 2.58% (4895/189,770) used the app actively. The day of week and time of day the app was initially used was associated with adherence, where 20.28% (5237/25,820) of Users had started using the app during the daytime on weekdays, in comparison to 15.34% (24,718/161,113) of Dropouts. Users with strict diets were more likely to be Active (14.31%, 900/6291) than those who had not defined any diet (3.99%, 742/18,590), said they ate everything (9.47%, 3040/32,090), or reported some other diet (11.85%, 213/1798) (χ23=826.6, P
    • File Description:
      electronic resource
    • ISSN:
      1438-8871
    • Relation:
      http://www.jmir.org/2014/4/e109/; https://doaj.org/toc/1438-8871
    • Accession Number:
      10.2196/jmir.3084
    • Accession Number:
      edsdoj.1e69d211a424d81bf4418aa50863c97