Improving Asthma Care by Building Statewide Quality Improvement Infrastructure.

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    • Abstract:
      BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Pediatric medical professionals have an increasing desire for quality improvement (QI) methods that produce sustainable changes in health care delivery. Previous reports have described QI in single settings or single coordinating entities that work with multiple sites. The objectives of this project are (1) to improve care for children with asthma across multiple practice settings and (2) to develop state-level expertise to support QI projects across entities in multiple states. METHODS: Using a multiwave approach, the Chapter Quality Network of the American Academy of Pediatrics implemented statewide learning collaboratives in several states. For each cycle, a national leadership team coached multiple American Academy of Pediatrics chapter leadership teams, which, in turn, coached individual pediatric practices through 2 nested learning collaboratives. State chapters received data and reporting tools and a curriculum fostering QI learning and support change at the practice level. Practices implemented an asthma assessment tool and registry, analyzed work flows, and implemented self-management tools in plan-do-study-act cycles. Sixteen process and outcome measures, including optimal asthma care, were collected and analyzed by using run charts on a monthly dashboard. Chapter leaders provided feedback on sustainable QI change through surveys and interviews. RESULTS: Optimal asthma care improved from 42% to 81% across the 4 waves. The percentage of patients rated by physicians as well controlled rose from 59% to 74%. CONCLUSIONS: Asthma care can be improved by supporting practice change through statewide QI learning collaboratives [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
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