Mood, activity, and sleep measured via daily smartphone-based self-monitoring in young patients with newly diagnosed bipolar disorder, their unaffected relatives and healthy control individuals.

Item request has been placed! ×
Item request cannot be made. ×
loading   Processing Request
  • Additional Information
    • Subject Terms:
    • Abstract:
      Diagnostic evaluations and early interventions of patients with bipolar disorder (BD) rely on clinical evaluations. Smartphones have been proposed to facilitate continuous and fine-grained self-monitoring of symptoms. The present study aimed to (1) validate daily smartphone-based self-monitored mood, activity, and sleep, against validated questionnaires and clinical ratings in young patients with newly diagnosed BD, unaffected relatives (UR), and healthy controls persons (HC); (2) investigate differences in daily smartphone-based self-monitored mood, activity, and sleep in young patients with newly diagnosed BD, UR, and HC; (3) investigate associations between self-monitored mood and self-monitored activity and sleep, respectively, in young patients with newly diagnosed BD. 105 young patients with newly diagnosed BD, 24 UR and 77 HC self-monitored 2 to 1077 days (median [IQR] = 65 [17.5–112.5]). There was a statistically significantly negative association between the mood item on Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) and smartphone-based self-monitored mood (B = − 0.76, 95% CI − 0.91; − 0.63, p < 0.001) and between psychomotor item on HAMD and self-monitored activity (B = − 0.44, 95% CI − 0.63; − 0.25, p < 0.001). Smartphone-based self-monitored mood differed between young patients with newly diagnosed BD and HC (p < 0.001), and between UR and HC (p = 0.008) and was positively associated with smartphone-based self-reported activity (p < 0.001) and sleep duration (p < 0.001). The findings support the potential of smartphone-based self-monitoring of mood and activity as part of a biomarker for young patients with BD and UR. Smartphone-based self-monitored mood is better to discriminate between young patients with newly diagnosed BD and HC, and between UR and HC, compared with smartphone-based activity and sleep. Trial registration clinicaltrials.gov NCT0288826 [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
    • Abstract:
      Copyright of European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry is the property of Springer Nature and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)